Thursday, January 24, 2013

Book, Line, and Sinker by Jenn McKinlay

Book, Line, and Sinker lives up to its claim: A Library Lovers Mystery. The main character in this cozy is Lindsey Norris, Library Director for the Briar Creek Public Library. Located on the Connecticut coast, Briar Creek is a charming small town where nothing bad happens. Well, that is not quite true. When a salvage company comes to town to look for Captain Kidd's treasure on an island right off the coast, lots of bad things start to happen. And worst of all...a murder! Lindsey and children's librarian Beth find themselves right in the middle of it all, along with several library patrons and Lindsey's new beau, Mike Sullivan.

Avid readers and frequent library visitors will love all the references made in this novel to book characters and reading clubs, as well as all of the colorful library staff and patrons.

Karen

Read-alike: Miss Zukas Mysteries by Jo Dereske

Saturday, January 19, 2013

The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton

If you are looking for a sweeping family saga, then Kate Morton will never disappoint. The Forgotten Garden spans decades and follows the lives of three generations of women. I cannot go into much detail as everything I say could potentially be a spoiler alert, so let's just say that there are more secrets, more lies, and more twists in this novel than in anything else I have read in a long time. The novel begins with a little girl boarding a ship for parts unknown, and ending up abandoned on the Australian coast. And from there... Amazing writing. Amazing storytelling. Amazing drama.

Enjoy!

Karen

Read alike author: Barbara Vine

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers


There is nothing truly new in Kevin Powers’ Iraq War novel The Yellow Birds, but the author does wonderful things with familiar material. The main characters are Private Bartle, a 21 year old soldier who narrates the book and is about as competent in war as can be expected, Murph, an even younger and very fragile soldier he befriends, and Sergeant Sterling, their grizzled, battle-tested leader. These character types have appeared in plenty of war movies and novels, but it’s the spectacular voice Powers gives Bartle that makes this not just a war novel but one that could very well be the novel about the Iraq War.

Early in the book, Private Bartle makes a promise to Private Murphy’s mother that he will “bring him home” to her.  Sergeant Sterling overhears this exchange and later in a drunken rage physically attacks Bartle for making such a promise. It seems like a savage attack, and it is, but as the story shows the increasing horrors of the war and the confusion the soldiers have in regards to what they are trying to accomplish in Iraq, Sterling’s anger starts to make at least some sense. I won’t give away more of the plot as the actual story is quite simple. Again, the characters and Powers’ writing are what set The Yellow Birds apart.

John

Thursday, January 3, 2013

Cooks in the Kitchen

I'm currently reading My Berlin Kitchen by Luisa Weiss, and I'm falling in love with it. Besides being an excellent book, it's making me think of the other food writing memoirs I've read. I'm not much of a cook, but there's something about a cooking memoir that I love. If you are interested in these types of books, too, here's a list for further reading. Enjoy!

Apron Anxiety: My Messy Affairs In and Out of the Kitchen by Alyssa Shelasky

Apron Anxiety is the hilarious and heartfelt memoir of quintessential city girl Alyssa Shelasky and her crazy, complicated love affair with...the kitchen.

Three months into a relationship with her TV-chef crush, celebrity journalist Alyssa Shelasky left her highly social life in New York City to live with him in D.C. But what followed was no fairy tale: Chef hours are tough on a relationship. Surrounded by foodies yet unable to make a cup of tea, she was displaced and discouraged. Motivated at first by self-preservation rather than culinary passion, Shelasky embarked on a journey to master the kitchen, and she created the blog Apron Anxiety (ApronAnxiety.com) to share her stories. 

 
A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table by Molly Wizenberg


When Molly Wizenberg's father died of cancer, everyone told her to go easy on herself, to hold off on making any major decisions for a while. But when she tried going back to her apartment in Seattle and returning to graduate school, she knew it wasn't possible to resume life as though nothing had happened. So she went to Paris, a city that held vivid memories of a childhood trip with her father, of early morning walks on the cobbled streets of the Latin Quarter and the taste of her first pain au chocolat. She was supposed to be doing research for her dissertation, but more often, she found herself peering through the windows of chocolate shops, trekking across town to try a new pâtisserie, or tasting cheeses at outdoor markets, until one evening when she sat in the Luxembourg Gardens reading cookbooks until it was too dark to see, she realized that her heart was not in her studies but in the kitchen.

Julie & Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously by Julie Powell

Nearing 30 and trapped in a dead-end secretarial job, Julie Powell reclaims her life by cooking every single recipe in Julia Child's legendary Mastering the Art of French Cooking in the span of one year. It's a hysterical, inconceivable redemptive journey - life rediscovered through aspics, calves' brains and crème brûlée. 



  
Making Piece: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Pie by Beth M. Howard

When journalist Beth M. Howard's young husband dies suddenly, she packs up the RV he left behind and hits the American highways. At every stop along the way—whether filming a documentary or handing out free slices on the streets of Los Angeles—Beth uses pie as a way to find purpose. Howard eventually returns to her Iowa roots and creates the perfect synergy between two of America's greatest icons—pie and the American Gothic House, the little farmhouse immortalized in Grant Wood's famous painting, where she now lives and runs the Pitchfork Pie Stand.

Making Piece powerfully shows how one courageous woman triumphs over tragedy. This beautifully written memoir is, ultimately, about hope. It's about the journey of healing and recovery, of facing fears, finding meaning in life again, and moving forward with purpose and, eventually, joy. It's about the nourishment of the heart and soul that comes from the simple act of giving to others, like baking a homemade pie and sharing it with someone whose pain is even greater than your own. And it tells of the role of fate, second chances and the strength found in community.


My Berlin Kitchen: A Love Story (With Recipes) by Luisa Weiss


My Berlin Kitchen tells the story of how one thoroughly confused, kitchen-maid perfectionist broke off her engagement to a handsome New Yorker, quit her dream job, and found her way to a new life, a new man, and a new home in Berlin—one recipe at a time.

Luisa Weiss grew up with a divided heart, shuttling back and forth between her father in Boston and her Italian mother in Berlin. She was always yearning for home, until she found a new home in the kitchen. Luisa started clipping recipes in college and was a cookbook editor in New York when she decided to bake, roast, and stew her way through her, by then, unwieldy collection over the course of one tumultuous year. The blog she wrote to document her adventures in (and out) of the kitchen, The Wednesday Chef, soon became a sensation. But she never stopped hankering for Berlin.


My Life from Scratch by Gesine Bullock-Prado 

As head of her celebrity sister’s production company, Gesine Bullock-Prado had a closet full of designer clothes and the ear of all the influential studio heads, but she was miserable. The only solace she found was in her secret hobby: baking. With every sugary, buttery confection to emerge from her oven, Gesine took one step away from her glittery, empty existence—and one step closer to her true destiny. Before long, she and her husband left the trappings of their Hollywood lifestyle behind, ending up in Vermont, where they started the gem known as Gesine Confectionary. And they never looked back. My Life from Scratch follows Gesine's journey from sugar-obsessed child to miserable, awkward Hollywood insider to reluctant master baker. Chock-full of eccentric characters, beautifully detailed descriptions of her baking process, ceaselessly funny renditions of Hollywood nonsense, and recipes, the ingredients of her story will appeal to anyone who has ever considered leaving the life they know and completely starting over.


 My Life in France by Julia Child

Julia Child singlehandedly created a new approach to American cuisine with her cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking and her television show The French Chef, but as she reveals in this bestselling memoir, she was not always a master chef. Indeed, when she first arrived in France in 1948 with her husband, Paul, who was to work for the USIS, she spoke no French and knew nothing about the country itself. But as she dove into French culture, buying food at local markets and taking classes at the Cordon Bleu, her life changed forever with her newfound passion for cooking and teaching. Julia’s unforgettable story – struggles with the head of the Cordon Bleu, rejections from publishers to whom she sent her now-famous cookbook, a wonderful, nearly fifty-year long marriage that took them across the globe – unfolds with the spirit so key to her success as a chef and a writer, brilliantly capturing one of the most endearing American personalities of the last fifty years.

 The Soul of a Chef: The Journey Toward Perfection by Michael Ruhlman

In his second in-depth foray into the world of professional cooking, Michael Ruhlman journeys into the heart of the profession. Observing the rigorous Certified Master Chef exam at the Culinary Institute of America, the most influential cooking school in the country, Ruhlman enters the lives and kitchens of rising star Michael Symon and renowned Thomas Keller of the French Laundry. This fascinating book will satisfy any reader's hunger for knowledge about cooking and food, the secrets of successful chefs, at what point cooking becomes an art form, and more. Like Ruhlman's The Making of a Chef, this is an instant classic in food writing-one of the fastest growing and most popular subjects today.

 Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table by Ruth Reichl


At an early age, Ruth Reichl discovered that "food could be a way of making sense of the world. . . . If you watched people as they ate, you could find out who they were." Her deliciously crafted memoir is the story of a life determined, enhanced, and defined in equal measure by a passion for food, unforgettable people, and the love of tales well told.  Beginning with Reichl's mother, the notorious food-poisoner known as the Queen of Mold, Reichl introduces us to the fascinating characters who shaped her world and her tastes, from the gourmand Monsieur du Croix, who served Reichl her first soufflé, to those at her politically correct table in Berkeley who championed the organic food revolution in the 1970s.  Spiced with Reichl's infectious humor and sprinkled with her favorite recipes, Tender at the Bone is a witty and compelling chronicle of a culinary sensualist's coming-of-age. 


Yes, Chef: A Memoir by Marcus Samuelsson


Marcus Samuelsson was only three years old when he, his mother, and his sister—all battling tuberculosis—walked seventy-five miles to a hospital in the Ethiopian capital city of Addis Adaba. Tragically, his mother succumbed to the disease shortly after she arrived, but Marcus and his sister recovered, and one year later they were welcomed into a loving middle-class white family in Göteborg, Sweden. It was there that Marcus’s new grandmother, Helga, sparked in him a lifelong passion for food and cooking with her pan-fried herring, her freshly baked bread, and her signature roast chicken. From a very early age, there was little question what Marcus was going to be when he grew up.

Yes, Chef chronicles Marcus Samuelsson’s remarkable journey from Helga’s humble kitchen to some of the most demanding and cutthroat restaurants in Switzerland and France, from his grueling stints on cruise ships to his arrival in New York City, where his outsize talent and ambition finally come together at Aquavit, earning him a coveted New York Times three-star rating at the age of twenty-four. But Samuelsson’s career of  “chasing flavors,” as he calls it, had only just begun—in the intervening years, there have been White House state dinners, career crises, reality show triumphs and, most important, the opening of the beloved Red Rooster in Harlem. At Red Rooster, Samuelsson has fufilled his dream of creating a truly diverse, multiracial dining room—a place where presidents and prime ministers rub elbows with jazz musicians, aspiring artists, bus drivers, and nurses. It is a place where an orphan from Ethiopia, raised in Sweden, living in America, can feel at home.

With disarming honesty and intimacy, Samuelsson also opens up about his failures—the price of ambition, in human terms—and recounts his emotional journey, as a grown man, to meet the father he never knew. Yes, Chef is a tale of personal discovery, unshakable determination, and the passionate, playful pursuit of flavors—one man’s struggle to find a place for himself in the kitchen, and in the world.


Bon Appetit!

Carrie